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Class 7

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Annapurna Base Camp & Poon Hill

ABC Day 01 - Pokhara
ABC Day 02 - Nayapul to Ulleri
ABC Day 03 - Ulleri to Ghorepani
ABC Day 04 – Poon Hill
ABC Day 05 – Banthanti to Chomrong
ABC Day 06 – Chomrong to Bamboo
ABC Day 07 – Bamboo to Deurali
ABC Day 08 – Machapuchare Base Camp
ABC Day 09 – Annapurna Base Camp
ABC Day 10 – Chomrong to Nayapul

Annapurna Base Camp & Poon Hill


Annapurna (Sanskrit, Nepali, Newar: अन्नपूर्णा) is the name of a massif in the Himalayas that is known for its highest mountain--Annapurna I (elevation : 8091m), the 10th highest mountain in the world and one of the 14 8000ers. Although Annapurna I was the first 8000er to be summited way back in 1950, it also, as of 2012, has the greatest fatality rate, Read more
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Western Arthur Range

Western Arthurs 01 - Scott’s Peak Dam – Junction Creek
Western Arthurs 02 - Junction Creek - Lake Cygnus
Western Arthurs 03 - Lake Cygnus – Lake Oberon
Western Arthurs 04 - Lake Oberon – High Moor
Western Arthurs 06 - High Moor – Haven Lake
Western Arthurs 07 - Haven Lake – Promontory Lake
Western Arthurs 09 - Promontory Lake – Lake Rosanne
Western Arthurs 10 - Lake Rosanne – Wullyawa Creek
Western Arthurs 11 - Wullyawa Creek – Scott’s Peak Dam
Western Arthurs Campsites

The Western Arthur Range


The Western Arthur Range lies in Southwest National park, in Southwest Tasmania, and is one of the most dramatic mountain ridges in the whole of Australia. This World Heritage Area is known for its glaciated landscapes, jagged quartzite crags, spectacular lakes (approximately 30 of them, and along with the peaks and ridges, were named after celestial objects), unpredictable and violent weather, and of course the magnificent views!

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Stirling Ridge Walk

The Stirling Range is unique in many, many ways. Suddenly and abruptly rising from amongst very flat, nondescript lowlands, the range is a prominent feature in the landscape and can be seen clearly from vast distances. Spectacular cloud formations are frequently seen here, which explains the Aboriginal (the Wagyl Kaip people being the traditional custodians) name for the range, 'Koi Kyenunu-ruff', which means ‘mist rolling around the mountains’. Read more
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