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Ridges

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Western Arthurs Day 2 : Junction Creek - Lake Cygnus

Western Arthur Range Index

Across the Buttongrass Plains


We left Junction Creek at 09:00 the next morning and turned right along the Port Davey track at the junction that lay just to the South of the camp. The soft and diffused sunlight that morning was very pleasant, but the trail still remained very muddy. It lead to another river crossing approximately 1 kilometre in, before leading to elevated wooden platforms that lined the track as it crossed the muddy, flat buttongrass plains heading West. Read more
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Western Arthurs Day 1 : Scott's Peak Dam - Junction Creek

Western Arthur Range Index

Forest Groves


Damon and I parked the car at the carpark next to Huon Camp, and registered our names at the sign-in booth after disconnecting the car battery. I couldn't wait to get moving as the foreboding profile of the glaciated quartzite ridge of the Western Arthur's, that we had passed as we drove towards Scotts Peak Dam, had left me filled with a great deal of excitement and anticipation. Read more
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Western Arthur Range

Western Arthurs 01 - Scott’s Peak Dam – Junction Creek
Western Arthurs 02 - Junction Creek - Lake Cygnus
Western Arthurs 03 - Lake Cygnus – Lake Oberon
Western Arthurs 04 - Lake Oberon – High Moor
Western Arthurs 06 - High Moor – Haven Lake
Western Arthurs 07 - Haven Lake – Promontory Lake
Western Arthurs 09 - Promontory Lake – Lake Rosanne
Western Arthurs 10 - Lake Rosanne – Wullyawa Creek
Western Arthurs 11 - Wullyawa Creek – Scott’s Peak Dam
Western Arthurs Campsites

The Western Arthur Range


The Western Arthur Range lies in Southwest National park, in Southwest Tasmania, and is one of the most dramatic mountain ridges in the whole of Australia. This World Heritage Area is known for its glaciated landscapes, jagged quartzite crags, spectacular lakes (approximately 30 of them, and along with the peaks and ridges, were named after celestial objects), unpredictable and violent weather, and of course the magnificent views!

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Stirling Ridge Walk - Day 3

Stirling Ridge Walk Index

The Third Arrow to Bluff Knoll


Since we still had a considerable distance to cover, the group set off with a renewed sense of urgency at first light. It took just over 10 minutes to reach the second arrow and we rounded the top and descended it without any issues. I was somewhat surprised by how much easier it was compared to the third arrow. The trail was clear, the incline gradual, and there were no obstacles that needed to be overcome. Read more
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Stirling Ridge Walk - Day 2

Stirling Ridge Walk Index

Ellen's Peak to the Third Arrow


I woke up the next morning feeling damp, cold, and irritable. To my dismay, the lingering moisture from the mist had left my hammock and sleeping bag covered in condensation, completely stripping the goose down of its insulation properties. I lay there for a while feeling miserable and thought it ironic that I had been seen as something of a paragon of resilience, had been called 'a machine' and had been likened to Jason Bourne, just the day before. Read more
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Stirling Ridge Walk - Day 1

Stirling Ridge Walk Index

Fence Track to Ellen's Peak


Despite taking almost two hours, the long 6 km walk along the Boundary Fence Track from the (Phytophthora cinnamomi) dieback control barrier (just after the Gnowellen Road junction) to the entrance of the Stirling Range National Park was rather uneventful. Everyone seemed to be in an intrepid mood despite ending up with soggy boots early on after foolishly attempting to cross a flooded section with our footwear on. Read more
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